Symposium Sessions

Symposium Agenda: Monday, April 8

Symposium Film Series: Warrior Women

Hosted by Alpha Pi Omega Sorority
Monday, April 8
6 – 8 p.m.
Webb Auditorium

In the 1970s, with the swagger of unapologetic Indianness, organizers of the American Indian Movement (AIM) fought for Native liberation as a community of extended families.

Warrior Women is the story Madonna Thunder Hawk, one such AIM leader who cultivated a rag-tag gang of activist children - including her daughter Marcy - into a group called the “We Will Remember” survival group. Together, Madonna and Marcy fought for Native rights in an environment that made them more comrades than mother-daughter. Today, with Marcy now a mother herself, both women are still at the forefront of Native issues, fighting against the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota.

Through their story, the film explores what it means to balance a movement with motherhood and how activist legacies are passed down from generation to generation in the face of a government that has continually met native resistance with mass violence.

Symposium Agenda: Tuesday, April 9

Symposium Film Series: Shiloh – Q&A with Producer, Mark Williams (Choctaw)

Tuesday, April 9
3 – 4:30 p.m.
Webb Auditorium

What does it take to be a boxer today? Not only a boxer but a female, Native American? Watch Shiloh’s journey as we get a glimpse of what it takes to become a fighter. Already having won the 2015 Inter-collegiate title, this motivating story of a beautiful, hard working, young college student and her dreams will keep you cheering her on. Shiloh is the inspiring journey of Shy LeBeau.


Symposium Film Series: Apache 8 – Panel Q&A with Jolita Reidhead and Lacey Crawford

Hosted by Alpha Pi Omega Sorority
Tuesday, April 9
6 – 8 p.m.
Webb Auditorium

Apache 8 tells the story of an all-women wildland firefighter crew from the White Mountain Apache Tribe, who have fighting fires in Arizona and throughout the U.S. for over 30 years. The film delves into the challenging lives of these Native firefighters. Four extraordinary women from different generations of the Apache 8 crew share their personal narratives with humor and tenderness. They speak of hardship and loss, family and community and pride in being a firefighter from Fort Apache.

Symposium Agenda: Wednesday, April 10

Opening Ceremonies

Hosted by the Native American Student Association
Wednesday, April 10
9:30 – 11:30 a.m.
UC Ballroom

Posting of Colors by Kiowa Women Warriors
Welcome Remarks: Dr. Steve Turner, President, Northeastern State University
Chief Bill John Baker, Cherokee Nation
Chief Joe Bunch, United Keetoowah Band of the Cherokee Indians
Performance by Lani Hansen, Cherokee, Co-President of Native American Student Association
Crowning of Miss Native American NSU

Keynote Panel – Matriarch: Indigenous Centered Solutions Through Community Organizing

Sarah Adams-Cornell (Choctaw)
Kendra Wilson Clements (Choctaw)
Jacintha Webster (Choctaw)
Princella RedCorn (Omaha)
Summer Wesley (Choctaw)

Native communities have the power and knowledge to heal themselves. Learn more about organizing, implementing and sustaining community led, indigenous solutions to address issues impacting Indian Country like domestic violence, sexual assault, MMIW, indigenizing education, mental wellness and trauma healing.


Print Action by Southeastern Indian Artists Association

Wednesday, April 10
10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
UC 1st Floor Lobby

Live screen-printing from local artists! Bring your own t-shirt or other item to be printed, or get a paper print. Donations accepted.


Let’s Play Cherokee Scrabble

Wednesday, April 10
1 – 4 p.m.
Ballroom Lounge

Bill Limbacher ᏫᎵ ᎵᏆᏔ

Inspired by a prototype by Lula Elk and a print of a painting by Jeff Edwards, the presenter commissioned a written Cherokee version of Scrabble for personal use. 354 letter tiles and 7 blank tiles are used for the 87 characters of the Cherokee syllabary illustrated in the new Cherokee Nation curriculum book (ᏣᎳᎩ ᎣᏣᏕᎶᏆᎠ), including the letters /mv/ and /nah/ that are not in common use. Playing the game reinforces using the syllabary as a fundamental pillar of revitalization while at the same time encouraging the flow of verbal communication in the language. Participants are welcome to come and go during the 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm time frame.


Native Women and Neo-Colonialism: Understanding the Relationship Between Currency and the Land

Wednesday, April 10
1 – 1:50 p.m.
Room 222

Catheryn Jennings (Cherokee Nation), MA- Literature, PhD Cultural/Indigenous Rhetorics (in-process) at Michigan State University; Ezekiel Choffel, Doctoral Student at Syracuse University

This presentation considers the ways capitalism works as a pervasive and neo-colonial force.

Specific topics addressed are Native women on currency and Water Walkers resistance to land-based-capitalism.


Cherokee Women in Language Revitalization

Wednesday, April 10
1 – 1:50 p.m.
Room 223

Anna Sixkiller (Cherokee Nation), Cherokee Translation Specialist, Cherokee Nation; Kathy Sierra, Chair of Cherokee Language Consortium, Cherokee Nation; Cora Flute, Master Speaker, Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program; Phyllis Sixkiller, Curriculum Developer, Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program; Phyllis Edwards, Cherokee Translator, Cherokee Nation

These panelists are members of the last generation of Cherokee women whose first language is Cherokee. Listen to their perspectives on witnessing loss and revitalization of language in their communities.


Free Hearing Screenings

Wednesday, April 10
2 – 4 p.m.
Redbud Room

Stop by for a free hearing screening, hosted by the NSU Speech and Language Pathology program.


Native Women Inspiring Native Women

Wednesday, April 10
2 – 2:50 p.m.
Room 222

Nikolle Dixon (Choctaw Nation), Bachelor of Arts in English, minor in Creative Writing

Leslie Marmon Silko and Joy Harjo are two of the most well-known Native American writers, whose lives impacted their writing, in a way that bridges a connection with female writers.


Working with the “Missing Pieces” John Hair Cultural Center and Museum Exhibit Design

Wednesday, April 10
2 – 2:50 p.m.
Room 223

Farina King, PhD (Diné), Assistant Professor, Northeastern State University; Ernestine Berry (United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians), Director of the John Hair Cultural Center and Museum; NSU Student Presenters: Diana (Midge) Dellinger (Muscogee/Creek); Lindsey Chapman (Cherokee); Dillon Morris; Larry Carney (Cherokee)

NSU assistant professor and several students will share their experiences and work with a service learning and community outreach project to support a new exhibit at the John Hair Cultural Center and Museum titled, “Missing Pieces,” and the director of the museum will comment before opening the session to the audience for questions and conversation.


ᎦᏚᎩ in the Student Experience

Wednesday, April 10
3 – 3:50 p.m.
Room 222

Sky Wildcat (Cherokee/Muscogee Creek/Natchez), Geography, B.A., Psychology, B.A., Graduate Student, Northeastern State University

While there are many factors that affect Native student retention rates, family and social support are among those that are significantly influential. This presentation will feature stories and findings from NSU’s Native student group members as to how their involvement has affected their college experience.


Earth Shakers: The Influence of Cherokee Women

Wednesday, April 10
3 – 3:50 p.m.
Room 223

Callie Chunestudy, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Curator, Cherokee Heritage Center; America Meredith, MFA, (Cherokee), Publishing Editor, First American Art Magazine

A celebration of Cherokee women and their achievements in the arts, politics, and society. This exhibition traces how Cherokee women embed Indigenous cultural knowledge, even in experimental new genres, to share across generations.

Symposium Agenda: Thursday, April 11

General Session

Hosted by the Organization of Cherokee Language Learners
Thursday, April 11
10 – 11:30 a.m.
UC Ballroom

Video: Your Name Isn’t English

Keynote Presentation – Vitalizing the Dakota Language | Sponsored by OK Humanities

Erin Griffin, MA, (Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate), Director of Dakota Studies, Sisseton Wahpeton College

The number of speakers of the Dakota Language has continually dropped despite the continued efforts of many language programs and decades of work. In five years, Sisseton Wahpeton College has made progress in reversing this trend by creating news speakers, working towards establishing family language nests and immersion, and vitalizing the Dakota language within the Sisseton-Wahpeton community. The opportunities, barriers, and lessons learned that have led to and impacted this advancement will be discussed.


Live Paint with Josh Stout

Hosted by the Native American Support Center
Thursday, April 11
11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
UC First Floor Lobby


ᏚᏗᏱ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎤᏂᏃᎮᎸᏅᎢ

Thursday, April 11
1 – 2:15 p.m.
Room 222

Trey Adcock, PhD, (Cherokee Nation), Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Asheville; Gilliam Jackson (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians), Adjunct Professor of Cherokee Language, University of North Carolina at Asheville; Lou Jackson (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians), Retired Nurse Practitioner; Onita Bush, CHR-CNA, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

Using oral histories, archival materials and photographs the panel will present stories from alumni of the Snowbird Day School located in the Tuti Yi community of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.


Decolonize and Dismantle: Tribal Leadership as Colonial Spaces

Thursday, April 11
1 – 2:15 p.m.
Room 223

Trudie Jackson (Navajo), Doctoral Student, University of New Mexico

Navajo Nation leadership continues to be dominated by male tribal members seeking the highest office of the Navajo Nation while Navajo women are deterred running for the President of the Navajo Nation. Is this a result due to traditional teachings or the influence of Christianity and federal Indian policies?

Is the new millennium ready for a gender non-conforming tribal member to lead the Navajo Nation?


Continuing Leadership Development Beyond the University

Thursday, April 11
1 – 2:15 p.m.
Room 224

Summer Wilkie (Citizen of the Cherokee Nation), Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, Engineering Master’s student, University of Arkansas; Olivia Morgan (Choctaw Nation Citizen), Bachelor of Arts in Psychological Science, Behavioral Intervention Specialist

Two recent University of Arkansas graduates discuss their leadership experiences as students and their ideas about how to transition leadership skills into the work place and community after graduation.


Indigenous Environment Justice Movement: Students Bringing Awareness to Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

Thursday, April 11
2:30 – 3:45 p.m.
Room 222

Amanda R. Young (MHA Nation), Master of Arts, Counseling Psychology Doctorial Student, Oklahoma State University; Michael Azarani

Indigenous students advocates sharing their stories and providing information on how to bring awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women through Environmental Justice Movements.


Lyda Burton Conley, First American Indian Woman Lawyer

Thursday, April 11
2:30 – 3:45 p.m.
Room 223

Kristen Zane (Wyandot Nation of Kansas), Bachelor of Civil Engineering, PE Emeritis, Wyandot Nation of Kansas Director of Special Projects; Holly Zane (Wyandot Nation of Kansas), Wyandot Nation of Kansas Tribal Counsel; Judy Manthe (Wyandot Nation of Kansas), Wyandot Nation of Kansas Secretary, Cemetery Commissioner; Mary (Molly) Zane (Wyandot Nation of Kansas), Student at Texas A&M University

Lyda Burton Conley, Wyandot, was the first woman admitted to the Kansas bar and first Native American woman admitted to argue a case before the US Supreme Court.

Symposium Agenda: Friday, April 12

General Session

Hosted by the American Indian Business Leaders
Friday, April 12
10 – 11:30 a.m.
UC Ballroom

Book signing to follow at Barnes and Noble Bookstore (1st Floor)

Keynote Presentation – Indigenous Women: Community, Society, and Native Well-Being | Sponsored by OK Humanities

Mary Jo Tippeconnic Fox, PhD, (Comanche/Cherokee), Research Professor, University of Arizona

A focus on the impact of Indigenous women on tribal sovereignty, Nation building, self-determination, and gender issues through activism, education, Indigenous feminism, tribalism, and social justice efforts at the tribal, national and global levels in the 21st century. Highlighting the contributions of a number of Indigenous women to demonstrate their impact upon their communities, society, and Native well-being.


NSU AISES Alumni Luncheon Panel

Friday, April 12
11:30 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Redbud Room
Ticket required ($10), limited seating. To purchase a ticket please visit the registration area.

Panelists: Stephn Drywater, MD, Emergency Medicine, Cherokee Nation W. W. Hastings Hospital; Sam Frazier, Geographical Information Systems Tech, Geospatial Department, Chickasaw Nation; Dr. Scott Williams, DDS, Commander, USPHS, Pediatric Dental Officer, Claremore Indian Hospital, IHS National Pediatric Dental Co-Consultant; Feather Smith-Trevino, Cultural Biologist, The Secretary of Natural Resources Office, Cherokee Nation; Sara Snell, PhD, Scientist, Process Development, Cytovance Biologics

The Northeastern State University American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) chapter invite you to attend their alumni panel luncheon. Former AISES members will share their academic and professional journey and experiences within their field. Tickets are required for this event and can be purchased at the registration area located on the 2nd floor of the University Center. Tickets are $10 per person.


Resisting Conformity: Indigenous Women and the Pursuit of College Education

Friday, April 12
1 – 1:50 p.m.
Room 222

Jennifer Talerico-Brown, PhD Candidate, University of California-Riverside; Alicia Nevaquaya (Choctaw), Associate Professor, Chair of American Indian Studies, Bacone College; Russell Lawson, PhD, Instructor, Northeastern State University

This panel features the experiences and histories of Indigenous women pursuing higher education at Bacone College in northeastern Oklahoma since the early twentieth century.


Cherokee Trivia Night

Friday, April 12
1 – 1:50 p.m.
Room 223

Shanista Cloud (Cherokee Nation), Bachelor of Arts, Cherokee Cultural Studies, Outreach Coordinator, Cherokee Heritage Center

Cherokee Trivia Night is a chance for members of the community to gather together and stretch their mental muscle. Teams will compete to see who has stored up the most knowledge of all things Cherokee. From history and language, to celebrities and food, Trivia Night will cover a wide range of topics all relating to Cherokees. This is a chance to come together, invite new people to the Cherokee Heritage Center, and provide a fun, light-hearted event for all ages.


Generations of Women Healers: Reflections from a Life Career in American Indian Health

Friday, April 12
1 – 1:50 p.m.
Room 224

Phil Smith (Diné), MD, MPH, Senior Clinician for Utah Navajo Health System and an Associate Faculty member at Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health

Dr. Smith is a descendant of generations of Diné healers, and he is the father and grandfather of future healer generations. His mother, grandmothers, and women in his family raised him to pursue healing and service. In his presentation and discussion with attendees, he will discuss the significance of women as healers to address the central symposium theme as well as reflect on his experiences working with American Indian health for decades.


Women in Performance: A Survey Overview of Indigenous Theatre in North America 1970s – Today

Friday, April 12
2 – 2:50 p.m.
Room 222

Candice Byrd (Cherokee/Quapaw/Osage), Bachelor’s of Science in Drama/Television/Film and Master’s of Fine Arts in Performance Arts

A survey overview to highlight the work of Indigenous women of North America in the area of performing arts. Examining works of playwrights, directors, and interdisciplinary performers from 1970s - today.


Advanced Cherokee Student Video Project

Friday, April 12
2:00 – 2:50 p.m.
Room 223

Wyman Kirk (Cherokee), Instructor, Northeastern State University; Student Panelists: ᏎᏗ Railey Eastwood (Cherokee); ᎠᏥᎸᏍᎩ Morgan Mouse (Cherokee); ᏗᎦᏣᏄᎵ Treybienne Pritchett (Cherokee)

A short video in the Cherokee language followed by audience discussion with the students from Advanced Cherokee.


Evaluating Remember the Removal Program

Friday, April 12
2 – 2:50 p.m.
Room 224

Melissa Lewis, PhD (Cherokee), Assistant Professor at the University of Missouri School of Medicine in the Department of Family & Community Medicine.

In this presentation, researchers and participants will discuss the results of two years of evaluations of the Remember the Removal program and its effect on the health and well-being of Cherokee young adults.


Indigenous Women at Texas Christian University: Presence, Absence, and Portrayal

Friday, April 12
3 – 3:50 p.m.
Room 222

Scott Langston, PhD, Instructor in Religion, Texas Christian University; Shara Kanerahtiiostha Francis-Herne (Mohawk), Graduate Student, Texas Christian University; Farina King, PhD (Navajo), Assistant Professor of History, Northeastern State University; Theresa Gaul, Professor of English, Texas Christian University; Jessica Martinez (Choctaw), Undergraduate Student, Texas Christian University

This panel will explore the ways that Indigenous women are present, absent, and portrayed at Texas Christian University and address underlying reasons, obstacles, and implications. Despite small numbers, Indigenous women are changing the university.


The Voice of Nancy Raven: The Preservation of Natchez Through Stories and Laughter

Friday, April 12
3 – 3:50 p.m.
Room 223

Ian McAlpin (Cherokee/Natchez), BA, Cherokee Cultural Studies (Language Revitalization)

The audio of Natchez language and culture expert’s voice brings attention to Indigenous perspectives during the era of Salvage Anthropology.


Traditional Stickball Game

Hosted by the Native American Student Association Friday, April 12
3 – 5 p.m.
Beta Field

Observe the game traditionally referred to as “little brother of war” among Southeastern tribes. Audience participation is welcome. Signed waiver of liability are required.


Keynote Presentation — Natural Law: Women Water Keepers

Hosted by Sigma Nu Alpha Gamma Fraternity and NSU AISES Chapter
Sponsored by OK Humanities
Friday, April 12
6 – 7:30 p.m.
UC Ballroom

Tara Houska, JD (Couchiching First Nation), National Campaigns Director, Honor the Earth

In many indigenous cultures, natural law holds women as keepers of the water. We see this natural order reflected in today’s environmental struggles; in successful movements to protect water, women are in leadership roles. How do we maintain our traditional roles while navigating the U.S. legal system? Westernized legal structures are centered around Mother Earth as a “resource” — how do we reconcile or work around that framework within traditional law?

Symposium Agenda: Saturday, April 13

Resilience Run: 5K and Fun Run

Saturday, April 13
9 a.m.
Beta Field

The NSU Running Hawks organization will be hosting the 47th Annual Symposium on the American Indian Resilience Run: 5K and Fun Run on Saturday, April 13. Registration is $10 in advance and $15 on-site. If you would like to register please visit the Resilience Run page.

The run will begin and end at Beta Field/NSU Centennial Plaza. Check in is at 8 a.m.; the race begins at 9 a.m.


NSU Powwow

Sponsored by The Oklahoma Arts Council
Saturday, April 13
3 p.m. – Midnight
UC Ballroom

3 – 5 p.m. | Gourd Dance
5 – 6:30 p.m. | Dinner Break, BCM
7 p.m. – Midnight | Grand Entry/Intertribal