Symposium Sessions

Monday, April 16

SYMPOSIUM FILM SERIES
Film Screening: The Old School House
Mark Williams (Choctaw)
5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Webb Auditorium

The 6th feature documentary from the Native American Paranormal Project explores a building on the campus of Northeastern State University known as The Old Bacone House, which serves as the university's Center for Tribal Studies. The current staff will tell you that history is alive and well, in spirit form. Over the last few decades many unexplained events have occurred, and many sights of unknown people roam the building. In August of 2017 the Native American Paranormal Project visited the old building and documented their time there. Their findings and the history of the 150 year-old home will be featured in "The Old School House" documentary.

Tuesday, April 17

SYMPOSIUM FILM SERIES
Film Screening: Te Ata
5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Webb Auditorium

Te Ata (TAY’ AH-TAH) is based on the inspiring, true story of Mary Thompson Fisher, a woman who traversed cultural barriers to become one of the greatest Native American performers of all time. Born in Indian Territory, and raised on the songs and stories of her Chickasaw culture, Te Ata’s journey to find her true calling led her through isolation, discovery, love and a stage career that culminated in performances for a United States president, European royalty and audiences across the world. Yet, of all the stories she shared, none are more inspiring than her own.

Starring Q’orianka Kilcher, Gil Birmingham, Brigid Brannagh, Mackezie Astin, and Graham Greene

Wednesday, April 18

Welcome and Opening Ceremony hosted by NASA
9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
UC Ballroom, 2nd FL

Official Opening & Introductions – Sara Barnett
(Muscogee Creek)
President, Native American Student Association (NASA), presiding – Jacob Chavez (Cherokee)
Presentation of Colors – Muscogee (Creek) Nation Color Guard
Grand Entry & Flag Song – Pat Oyebi
(Kiowa)
NSU Welcome – President Dr. Steve Turner
Cherokee Nation Welcome – Principal Chief Bill John Baker
United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians Welcome - Principal Chief Joe Bunch
Miss Native American NSU Crowning Ceremony

Keynote: Indigenerds Assemble! Native Americans in Popular Culture
Lee Francis IV, Ph.D.
(Pueblo of Laguna), CEO/PUblisher, Native Realities
UC Ballroom, 2nd Floor

For more than four hundred years, Native and Indigenous people have played a significant role in global popular culture. From the earliest portrayals of the “Noble Savage” through the villainous “Red Devil”, the images and representations of Native American and North American Indigenous Peoples have been used to shape policy and perpetuate efforts of genocide and ethnocide throughout North America. The rise of the Indigenerd coincides with concerted efforts by marginalized communities to assert themselves in establishing authentic representations within global pop culture (Smith, Choueiti & Pieper, 2016; CFMJ, 2015; Neill, 2009). The inclusion/exclusion of images and representations in popular culture have a profound impact on identity development, policy creation, and direct experiences by Native and Indigenous peoples (Phillips & Stegman, 2014). As such, it is beneficial for Indigenous activists to take on the mantle of Indigenerd in order to challenge the misrepresentations that continue to reinforce stereotypes. This talk will explore the history of Native and Indigenous people in popular culture and highlight some of the amazing efforts of Indigenerds worldwide to actively change the representations of Native people through dynamic and powerful expressions of self and culture.

Sponsor: Oklahoma Humanities Council


Keynote: keetweenci naanatawiteeheeyankwi?: Why do we research? - Role of Tribally Directed Research and Development in Language and Cultural Revitalization
1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.
UC Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Daryl Baldwin, M.A.
(Miami)

Language and cultural revitalization require a certain amount of educational capacity building, planning, teacher training, research for curricular content, and public relations work in the tribal community. Measurable outcomes often take years to materialize. So how does all this non-language work get done to support language programing? This talk will look at the role of the Myaamia Center at Miami University, a Miami Tribe of Oklahoma supported research center, whose mission it is to serve the needs of the Myaamia people, Miami University, and partner communities through research, education, and outreach that promote Myaamia language, culture, knowledge, and values.

Sponsor: Oklahoma Humanities Council


Panel Discussion: Remembering, Reclaiming, and Reimagining Who We Are through the Revitalization of Ceremonies, Language, and Life Ways
2:00 p.m. – 2:50p.m.
UC 222, 2nd Floor

Barbara Aston, Wyandotte Nation of Oklahoma; Sallie Andrews, Faithkeeper, Wandat Yanohsetsih, The Wyandotte Nation of Oklahoma), Deer Clan; Patty Garrison, Faithkeeper, Wandat Yanohsetsih, The Wyandotte Nation of Oklahoma, Bear Clan; Catherine Tammaro, Artist/Author, Faithkeeper, Anderdon Longhouse, The Wyandot of Anderdon Nation, Spotted Turtle Clan; Linda Sioui, M.A. Anthropology, Independent researcher and culture bearer, Huron/Wendat Nation (Quebec, Canada), Bear Clan.

The presentation will focus on the cultural revitalization and reaffirmation of Wendat/Wyandotte/Wyandot identity as experienced by women working together to reestablish their traditional ceremonies, language, and life ways.

Panel Discussion: Cherokee Lifeways
2:00 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
UC 224, 2nd Floor


Dr. Tiffanie Hardbarger (Cherokee), and 10 Cherokee undergrad students from the NSU "Cherokee Lifeways" course

Drawing upon ethnographic research conducted in Oklahoma and North Carolina, we compare and contrast flora/fauna, changes over time due to diaspora, and the impacts on Cherokee culture.

Shaping Bowlin Family Identity, the Confluence of Policy, Opportunity, and Determination
2:00 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
UC 225, 2nd Floor


Darnella Davis, Ed.D.

The presentation traces the legacy of a Cherokee Freedman family from the Allotment Era to the present using current scholarship on multiracial erasure in Indian Territory as an analytic lens.

The Journey from Self- Leadership to Other-Centered Leadership: From Theory to Practice with a Cultural-Historical Perspective
3:00 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.
UC 222, 2nd Floor


Dr. Carl Farinelli, NSU; Dr. Renee Cambiano, NSU

The authors have developed a developed several models that help to explain the social ecology of leaders and problem solving groups. In their many research papers and presentations that they have created together and with other colleagues, they describe how educational and community leaders definitions and practices of leadership can be affected by factors that are sometimes personal and cultural.

Using Virtual Reality to Teach Cherokee
3:00 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.
UC 224, 2nd Floor


Betty Frogg (Cherokee), Cherokee National Treasure; Dr. Angelina Dayton, Immersive Learning Specialist, Center for Teaching and Learning, Northeastern State University

Virtual Reality can create an immersive experience, where games make language-learning fun. This presentation will show how the Cherokee Nation Immersion School has used VR to teach language.


Creating Visionary Tribal Leaders for the Future
4:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.
UC 222, 2nd Floor


Barbara Aston (Wyandotte Nation of Oklahoma), Special Assistant to the Provost/Tribal Liaison/Director of Native American Programs

Creating Visionary Tribal Leaders grew out of collaboration between tribal leaders and a university for the purpose of preparing tribal members to return home and serve their tribal community.


Panel Discussion: Community & Cultural Sustainability
4:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.
UC 224, 2nd Floor


Dr. Tiffanie Hardbarger (Cherokee), NSU; Students from the NSU "Sustainable Communities" course

Students in the Sustainable Communities class will present the results of their Photovoice research project focused on community and cultural sustainability within a Cherokee context.

Thursday, April 19

General Session and Keynote Hosted by Cherokee Promise Scholars
9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
UC Ballroom, 2nd FL


Keynote: More Trails of Tears: Intergenerational Trauma in an Age of Climate Change
Dr. Dan Wildcat
(Yuchi)

This presentation examines the climate change induced trauma already occurring amount Indigenous Peoples and likely to dramatically increase in the next decades. In order to deal with this trauma this presentation argues we must rely on our Indigenous cultures to express tribal resilience through exercises of Indigenous ingenuity or Indigenuity.

Sponsor: Oklahoma Humanities Council


The Instrumental Importance of Special Collections and Archives
1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
UC 223, 2nd Floor


Brenda Bradford (Muscogee Creek), Head of Special Collections and Archives, Northeastern State University; Ashley Stoddard, Historical Specialist, Northeastern State University; Blain McClain, Archives Assistant, Northeastern State University

Northeastern State University Archives and Special Collections will hold a discussion over materials held by both collections that are vital to the cultural heritage of the University and surrounding area.

Horse and Buffalo People in Native America
1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
UC Ballroom, 2nd Floor


Penelope M. Kelsey (Seneca descent [patrilineal]), Ph.D., Professor of English, NSU; Dr. Ben Kracht, Cherokee and Indigenous Studies Department Chair, Professor of Anthropology, Northeastern State University; Kerri Clement, graduate student, University of Colorado at Boulder, Moderator/Chair and organizer of session; Dr. Farina King (Diné [Navajo]), Assistant Professor of History, Northeastern State University

“Return Buffalo People: Against Genocide in Tasha Hubbard’s Buffalo Calling” Kiowa Buffalo and Horse Days Directed by anthropologist Alexander Lesser in 1935, the Santa Fe Laboratory of Anthropology sponsored a field school in southwestern Oklahoma that focused on the neighboring Kiowas. During two months, graduate students compiled more than 1,300 pages of single-spaced field notes derived from cross-interviewing thirty-five Kiowas. These eyewitness and first-generation reflections on the horse and buffalo days are undoubtedly the best materials available for reconstructing pre-reservation Kiowa beliefs and rituals. The field school compiled massive data resulting in a number of publications on this formerly nomadic Plains tribe, though the planned collaborative ethnographies never materialized. The extensive Kiowa field notes, which contain invaluable information, remained largely unpublished until now. Based on my recent publication, this presentation will address my interpretations of Kiowa cosmology during the height of the horse and buffalo culture from field notes pertaining to cosmology, visions, shamans, sorcery, dream shields, tribal bundles, and the now-extinct Sun Dance ceremony. These topics are understood through the Kiowa concept of a power force permeating the universe. Additional data gleaned from the field notes of James Mooney and Alice Marriott enrich the narrative. Drawing on more than thirty years of field experiences, I will discuss how indigenous notions of “power” are manifested today significantly enhances the existing literature concerning Plains religions.


ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ in the Grocery
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
UC 222, 2nd Floor


Brian Barlow (Cherokee), Student Service Coordinator, Native American Support Center, NSU

Join Brian Barlow and his team in discussing their project - ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ in the Garden - and its potential to positively effect the daily lives of Cherokee people throughout Northeast Oklahoma.

Panel Discussion: Mapping Histories of Indian Education
2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
UC 223, 2nd Floor


Dr. Farina King (Diné [Navajo]), Assistant Professor of History, Northeastern State University; History of Indian Education class (12 students from NSU)

Students present on their research about historic sites of Indian education in the Tahlequah region, which they are developing for a Mapping Tahlequah History digital project.

Mobile Apps for Maskoke Language
2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Morgan 309, 3rd Floor


Wilhelm Meya, Executive Director, The Language Conservancy

Wilhelm Meya will present The Language Conservancy's work on a Maskoke Vocab Builder app, a vital new tool that will provide an effective and motivating learning experience targeting Creek and Seminole youth.

Panel Discussion: Honoring the Gifts: How Librarians and Museums Can Co-Create and Collaborate with Native Partners
2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
UC 222, 2nd Floor


Helen Clements, Professor, Research & Learning Services, Oklahoma State University Library; Diana Folsom (Choctaw), Director of Digital Collections, Gilcrease Museum

In Honoring the Gifts, members of five Oklahoma institutions present their latest efforts to preserve and pass on the Indian cultural heritage of Oklahoma in languages, education, and the arts.

Friday, April 20

Promoting Cultural Integrity through Education: Indigenous Faces and Spaces as Expressions of Sovereignty
9:00 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.
UC 222, 2nd Floor


Devon Isaacs (Cherokee), Utah State University; Dr. Melissa Tehee (Cherokee), J.D., Ph.D., Utah State University

Brief discussion of the relationship between Native American students and education will transition to a Talking Circle where topics for increasing Native American student retention and engagement will be explored.


Redeeming the Indian: Re-analyzing the Successes and Failures of Two North Texas Indian Reservations, 1854-1859
9:00 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.
UC 224, 2nd Floor


Zachary Nash, Southern Methodist University

Lecture and presentation that will address two short-lived Texas Indian reservations' attempts to "civilize" their residents, and the extent to which they succeeded and failed.

Are Our Men Okay: A Look at the Current Trend of Indigenous Men in Higher Education
9:00 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.
UC 225, 2nd Floor


Corey Still (United Keetoowah Band), Native Language Instructor, University of Oklahoma

This workshop/discussion will focus around exploring the statistics and trends that have been seen with Indigenous men over the past 20 years.

Panel Discussion: Bringing Indigenous Peoples into Traditionally Non-Indigenous Spaces
10:00 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.
UC Ballroom, 2nd Floor


Dr. Scott M. Langston, Texas Christian University; Chebon Kernell (Seminole), Executive Secretary of Native American and Indigenous Ministries of the United Methodist Church; Shara Francis-Herne (Mohawk), graduate student, Texas Christian University; Albert Nungaray (Puebloan), 2017 graduate of Texas Christian University; Steve Denson (Chickasaw), Director of MBA Diversity Initiatives and adjunct professor of Organization Behavior in the Cox School of Business at Southern Methodist University

A panel discussion exploring how environments in non-Indigenous colleges and universities can be created where Indigenous peoples and perspectives are respectfully engaged and mutually beneficial relationships are created with Indigenous communities.

Panel Discussion: Free Press in Indian Country: A Tribal Department's Perspective and Experience
10:00 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.
UC 222, 2nd Floor


Sterling Cosper (Muscogee Creek), Manager, Mvskoke Media, Muscogee Creek Nation; Jason Salsman (Muscogee Creek), Multimedia Producer; Gary Fife (Muscogee Creek), Radio Specialist

Mvskoke Media was separated from the MCN government in 2015 to provide unfiltered information to its citizens. Department staff discusses the importance of this and the challenges related to it.

Homegoing as a Practice for Retaining Indigenous Students
10:00 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.
UC 225, 2nd Floor


Tiffany Smith (Cherokee), Director, Women in Engineering Program, University of Oklahoma; Corey Still (United Keetoowah Band), Native Language Instructor, University of Oklahoma

This presentation will provide an overview of homegoing as a practice for retention, and offer practical insight on how to support Indigenous students at mainstream institutions.

AISES Day Luncheon with Dream Warriors: Tall Paul, Mic Jordan, Frank Waln, Tanaya Winder
Limited seating. To purchase tickets ($12 per person) please visit the registration area
11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Redbud 302, 3rd Floor


Native Women Writing the Land: Teaching Indigenous Land-Based Knowledge in English Studies
1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.
UC 222, 2nd Floor


Jaquetta Shade (Cherokee), “Unimaginable Landscapes of Loss”: Countering Settler Violence with Indigenous Memoir in Joy Harjo’s Crazy Brave and Deborah Miranda’s Bad Indians, PhD Candidate, Michigan State University; Dr. Kimberli Lee (Lakota), “All Our Relations:” Winona LaDuke and the Resistance to Environmental Devastation, Northeastern State University; Ezekiel Choffel, "Indigenous Writing Across the Great Lakes: teaching the land through story" Syracuse University

Native women authors writing from a land-based approach provide a framework to teach Indigenous knowledge. The three panelists describe their methods for bringing these teachings into their classrooms.

The Health Effects of the Remember the Removal program
1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.
UC 224, 2nd Floor


Dr. Melissa Lewis (Cherokee), Assistant Professor, University of Missouri School of Medicine; Remember the Removal Alumni Group

Remember the Removal is a culturally-grounded, Cherokee Nation youth leadership program. After evaluation, program results indicated the participants had improved physical, emotional, and cultural health and well-being after participation in this program.

Indigenous Storywork: Experience through Gaduwa Basket Making
2:00 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
UC 225, 2nd Floor


Tiffany Smith (Cherokee), Director, Women in Engineering Program, University of Oklahoma; Corey Still (United Keetoowah Band), Native Language Instructor, University of Oklahoma

This presentation will offer an Indigenous framework for research design by utilizing Archibald’s Indigenous storywork and the art of basketmaking to center our experiences from a Keetwoowah/Cherokee perspective.

Traditional Stickball Game
3:00p - 5:00p
Beta Field


Native American Student Association

Observe the game traditionally referred to as “little brother of war” among Southeastern tribes. Audience participation is welcome. Signed waivers of liability are required.

Sponsor: Native American Student Association

Special Performance with Dream Warriors: Tall Paul, Frank Waln, Mic Jordan and Tanaya Winder
6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
NSU Jazz Lab

Live Performance.

Saturday, April 21

NSU Powwow
3:00 p.m. – Gourd Dancing
5:00 p.m. – Dinner Break
7:00 p.m. – Grand Entry/Intertribal
UC Ballroom, 2nd FL

MC: Stanley John (Redshirt) Navajo
Arena Director: Tony Ballou Cherokee/Creek/Navajo
Host Drum: Joel Deerinwater Muscogee(Creek)/Cherokee
Head Gourd: Chris Chanate Kiowa/Cherokee
Head Man: Daniel Roberts Muscogee (Creek)/Aleut/Choctaw
Head Lady: Robyn Chanate Cherokee/Kiowa

Sponsor: Oklahoma Arts Council