Symposium Speakers

2018 Symposium Speakers Bios

Daryl Baldwin, M.A. (Miami) – Keynote Speaker Sponsored by OHC
Daryl Baldwin is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma. He was born and raised around the Great Lakes area and currently resides in Liberty, Indiana with his wife and four children. Daryl’s forefathers were active in the affairs of the Miami Nation dating back to the 18th century, and he continues this dedication through his work in language and cultural revitalization. Daryl graduated in 1999 from The University of Montana with a Masters in Arts with emphasis in Native American linguistics. Since 1995, he has worked with the Myaamia people developing culture and language-based educational materials and programs for the tribal community. Daryl is currently the Director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. The Myaamia Center is a joint venture between the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and Miami University. Mr. Baldwin will discuss his involvement with the language and cultural revitalization efforts of the Miami Tribe.

Dr. Lee Francis IV (Laguna) – Keynote Speaker Sponsored by NASC
Lee Francis IV is the current National Director of Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers, the position he assumed after the passing of his father, Wordcraft Founder, Dr. Lee Francis III. He previously served as the Executive Director of the Pueblo of Laguna Education Foundation and the Youth Development Coordinator for Laguna Partners For Success. In his career, Dr. Francis has had the distinct pleasure to work as a classroom instructor at Laguna-Acoma High School, the University of New Mexico, and the Native American Community Academy. In 2014, he received his PhD in Education from Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas. His work as a poet and scholar has appeared in numerous journals and anthologies. Dr. Francis will provide an overview of his work with the Woodcraft Circle and Native Realities publishing, where he focuses on promoting stories as a means of local development and cultural sustainability.

Elizabeth Homer
(Osage) – Keynote Speaker Sponsored by OHC
Prior to establishing Homer Law, CHTD., Elizabeth Lohah Homer, a member of the Osage Nation of Oklahoma, completed a three-year term of appointment as Vice Chairman of the National Indian Gaming Commission. A proponent of collaborative rulemaking, Ms. Homer was instrumental in affecting tribal involvement in the Commission's regulatory processes through the establishment of tribal advisory committees and other consultative activities during her tenure with the Commission. Ms. Homer has had a distinguished career in public service. She served as the Director of the Office of American Indian Trust at the U.S. Department of the Interior where she worked closely with tribal governments and federal policy makers to advance issues and policies of concern to American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments as well as Native Hawaiians. As the Director of the Office, she supervised the implementation of a number of Administration policy priorities in the areas of tribal natural and cultural resources, consultation, and negotiated rulemaking, including President Clinton's Executive Orders regarding Sacred Sites and Tribal Consultation. A recognized authority on federal Indian law and policy, she also served on several U.S. diplomatic delegations to the United Nations and the Organization of American States on matters concerning the civil and political rights of Indigenous peoples. Dr. Homer will provide an overview of tribal sovereignty in current society and will address some of the most recent legal cases related to treaty rights.

Dr. Daniel Wildcat
(Yuchi) – Keynote Speaker Sponsored by OHC
Daniel Wildcat, Ph.D., is a professor at Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas, and an accomplished scholar who writes on Indigenous knowledge, technology, environment, and education. He is also co-director of the Haskell Environmental Research Studies Center, which he founded with colleagues from the Center for Hazardous Substance Research at Kansas State University. A Yuchi member of the Muscogee Nation of Oklahoma, Dr. Wildcat is the coauthor, with Vine Deloria Jr. of Power and Place: Indian Education in America (Fulcrum, 2001), and coeditor, with Steve Pavlik, of Destroying Dogma: Vine Deloria Jr. and His Influence on American Society (Fulcrum, 2006). Known for his commitment to environmental defense and cultural diversity, Dr. Wildcat has been honored by the Kansas City organization, The Future Is Now, with the Heart Peace Award. Dr. Wildcat will speak about his newest book, Red Alert! Saving the Planet with Indigenous Knowledge. More specifically, Dr. Wildcat will discuss the social science behind intergenerational trauma associated with the historical removals of Indian people and will also discuss the role of traditional (Indigenous) knowledge in the healing process.