Center for Tribal Studies Events

Indigenous Leadership Summit

The Center for Tribal Studies will be hosting its 4th Annual Indigenous Leadership Summit February 23-26, 2021. The event this year will be virtual using the Zoom platform. This event typically features Indigenous speakers who facilitate sessions relating to leadership in topics such as healing, organizations, and community.

Registration is not required to attend but if you would like to stay up-to-date on our events and entered for a door prize, please complete the registration link below.

REGISTRATION: https://forms.gle/Rj7YZtsSoigDywv46

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: Dr. Andrew Jolivette, Professor and Chair of the Ethnic Studies Department, University of California, San Diego; Dr. Tracy Bear, Assistant Professor, University of Alberta; Dr. Johnny Poolaw, Associate Director of Student Success Services, AISES; Jasha Lyons Echo-hawk, Community and Justice Advocate; Dr. Farina King, Assistant Professor, Northeastern State University; Matti Martin, Healer, Body-Worker, Activist, Scholar, and Artist

COFFEE TALK SPEAKERS: Kasey Rhone, NSU Diversity & Inclusion Coordinator; Ashley Carter, Master of Science in Leadership, NSU; Elizabeth Stroud, Political Science, NSU; Lakin Keener, Master of Science in Leadership, NSU.

Tuesday, February 23, 2021

Dr. Andrew Jolivette (Atakapa-Ishak Nation of Louisiana [Tsikip/Opelousa/Heron Clan])
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM CST
Webinar Link: https://nsuok.zoom.us/j/91840063803
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Keynote Title: Black Lives, Indigenous Lives: From Mattering to Thriving

What can we learn from Black and Indigenous history, activism, and contemporary stewardship efforts in order to transform higher education, health, policing, and other Western institutions?

This dialogue will examine and discuss major points of cultural and historic community convergence between Black and Indigenous Peoples with a focus on contemporary movements such as Black Lives Matter and Idle No More and the dismantling of racist statues, images, and mascots.

Dr. Andrew Jolivétte will explore what these movements mean for enacting justice interventions and moving towards thrivance circuity, kinship building, self-determination, and abolition as transformational modes of joy production and ceremonial stewardship.

Coffee Talk with Kasey Rhone
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM CST
Zoom Meeting: https://nsuok.zoom.us/j/92024317831
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The Coffee Talk continues a discussion after Dr. Andrew Jolivette's keynote presentation. This event has been created to provide an open and safe space for participants to share their thoughts. We ask that anyone who attends to be mindful and respectful of others.

Wednesday, February 24, 2021

Dr. Tracy Bear [Nehiyaw iskwêw (Cree woman)]
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM CST
Webinar Link: https://nsuok.zoom.us/j/91840063803
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Keynote Tite: Red Erotic: The Fall and Rise of Indigenous Erotics

In the realm of Indigenous erotics, re-imagining encompasses acts of nonconformity, resistance, and subversion. These are alternative ways of envisioning the past, present and future. Indigenous writers and artists are generating new landscapes, and new possibilities of “Indigenous subjectivity, sociality, and spatiality … a process of creating newness from existing materials, seemingly out of nowhere” (Rifkin 99). While Rifkin states these new possibilities come from seemingly ‘nowhere’, there is in fact, a rich Indigenous archive from which to draw from and these landscapes are the collective Indigenous identity stemming from individual and collective experiences of Indigenous people. Re-imaginings do not conform to the current logics of settler colonial power; they resist the colonial ‘managing’ of Indians by the Indian Act and avoid impositions of legal definitions of ourselves. Re-imaginings are also subversive actions taken up by Indigenous authors to disrupt colonial stereotypes. This talk presents Indigenous erotics as a state of re-imagining the corporeal coalescence of our sexualities, genders, histories, memories and emotions, and functions as a powerful decolonizing mechanism.

This event is co-sponsored by the Native American Support Center, Center for Women's Studies, NSU Student Engagement and Diversity & Inclusion.

Coffee Talk with Ashley Carter, Liz Stroud, and Lakin Keener
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM CST
Zoom Meeting: https://nsuok.zoom.us/j/92024317831
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The Coffee Talk continues a discussion after Dr. Tracy Bear's keynote presentation. This event has been created to provide an open and safe space for participants to share their thoughts. We ask that anyone who attends to be mindful and respectful of others.

Thursday, February 25, 2021

Dr. Johnny Poolaw (Delaware/Chiricahua Apache/Comanche/Kiowa)
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM CST
Webinar Link: https://nsuok.zoom.us/j/91840063803
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Keynote Title: Info coming soon

Coffee Talk with Ashley Carter, Liz Stroud, and Lakin Keener
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM CST
Zoom Meeting: https://nsuok.zoom.us/j/92024317831
Google calender iconClick to SAVE THIS EVENT and add to your appropriate calendar

The Coffee Talk continues a discussion after Dr. Johnny Poolaw's keynote presentation. This event has been created to provide an open and safe space for participants to share their thoughts. We ask that anyone who attends to be mindful and respectful of others.

Friday, February 26, 2021

Jasha Lyons Echo-Hawk, Dr. Farina King and Matti Martin
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM CST
Webinar Link: https://nsuok.zoom.us/j/91840063803
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Panel Title: Patriarchal Colonialism and its Impact on Matrilineal and Patrilineal Indigenous Social Systems

Indigenous Leadership Summit Speakers

Dr. Andrew Jolivette
Dr. Andrew Jolivétte (Atakapa-Ishak Nation of Louisiana [Tsikip/Opelousa/Heron Clan]) is Professor and Chair of the Ethnic Studies Department at the University of California, San Diego as wellas the 

inaugural founding Director of Native American and Indigenous Studies at UCSD. A former professor and Department Chair of American Indian Studies at San Francisco State University, he is the author or editor of nine books in print or forthcoming including the Lammy Award nominated, Indian Blood: HIV and Colonial Trauma in San Francisco’s Two-Spirit Community. His scholarship examines Native American, Indigenous, Creole, Black, Latinx, Queer, Mixed-Race, and Comparative Critical Ethnic Studies. Dr. Jolivétte is the 2020-21 MultiRacial Network Scholar in Residence for the American Personnel Association and the Series Editor of Black Indigenous Futures and Speculations at Routledge. His current book project, Thrivance Circuitry: Queer Afro-Indigenous Futurity and Kinship is under contract with the University of Washington Press.

Dr. Tracy Bear
Tracy is a rabble-rouser, erotic warrior, Nehiyaw iskwêw (Cree woman) from Montreal Lake First Nation in northern Saskatchewan. She has a PhD in English and Film Studies and her dissertation: "Power In My Blood: Corporeal Sovereignty Through a Praxis of Indigenous Eroticanalysis" won the Governor General Gold Medal award in 2016. She is an Assistant Professor cross appointed with the Faculty of Native Studies and the Dept. of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Alberta. She was the Academic Lead and Professor of Record of a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) called ‘Indigenous Canada’ which was the most popular online course in Canada for 2017 with over 220,000 students registered. She the co-producer with Kim Tallbear and Kirsten Lindquist of an erotic, sexy storytelling and performance based show and Research-Creation Laboratory series project called Tipi Confessions. Tracy has been volunteering and teaching in prisons on and off since 2010 and has created a Walls to Bridges program that brings post-secondary 3-credit courses to incarcerated Indigenous women at the Edmonton Institute for Women. She is also the Director of the Indigenous Women & Youth Research Project.

Dr. Johnny Poolaw
Dr. Johnny Poolaw is a citizen of the Delaware Nation and is also a descendent of the Chiricahua Apache, Comanche, and Kiowa Nations. He currently serves as the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) Associate Director of Student Success Services.

Dr. Poolaw has a Bachelor of Science in Zoology from the University of Oklahoma, a Master of Arts in Teaching from Cameron University, and Master and Doctorate Degrees in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from the University of Oklahoma. For the past 16 years, Johnny has served his Indigenous community and primarily Indigenous students in higher education in various roles. Prior to working with AISES, he was the Acting Tribal Liaison Officer for the University of Oklahoma and before that role, he served as an instructor, Dean of Student Services, and as the Vice President of Student and Academic Affairs at the Comanche Nation Tribal College in Lawton, Oklahoma. Of all the roles he has held, he has always thought of the heartwork he does with Native students as the most rewarding.

Dr. Johnny Poolaw grew up in the Mountain Scott area of Oklahoma just outside of Lawton. He enjoys spending his free time traveling, watching the Oklahoma City Thunder and the Oklahoma Sooners, and having fun with his two nieces, Jessie and Taylor.

Jasha Lyons Echo-Hawk
Jasha Lyons Echo-Hawk is a life-long justice seeker, community builder, and part-time marathoner. She is Two-spirit and a proud tribal citizen of the Seminole Nation, as well as a member of the Pawnee, Iowa, Omaha, and Creek Nations.

Jasha has organized in rural Oklahoma on such issues as healthcare access, violence against women, breast/chestfeeding advocacy and birth justice, food sovereignty, gun violence prevention, criminal justice reform, Census & voter outreach, and as a former political candidate. Jasha has also helped to found Native Breastfeeding Week and was an inaugural NDN Collective Changemaker fellow. Recently, she co-led the Oklahoma effort of the national Natives Vote 2020 campaign.

Jasha is a DONA-trained Birthworker and a student midwife as well as pursuing a Master of Legal Studies in Indigenous People’s Law at the University of Oklahoma’s College of Law. She maintains an active lifestyle with her spouse, Bunky, and their four children.

Dr. Farina King
Bilagáanaa niliigo’ dóó Kinyaa’áanii yásh’chíín. Bilagáanaa dabicheii dóó Tsinaajinii dabinálí. Ákót’éego diné asdzáá nilí. Farina King is “Bilagáanaa” (Euro-American), born for “Kinyaa’áanii” (the Towering House Clan) of the Diné (Navajo). Her mother is of English-American descent from Michigan, and her father is Navajo from the Rehoboth, New Mexico checkerboard region of Diné Bikéyah (Navajoland). Her maternal grandfather was European-American, and her paternal grandfather was “Tsinaajinii” (Black-streaked Woods People Clan) of the Diné. Farina was born in Tuba City, Arizona and lived on the Navajo reservation as a small child, until her family moved to the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area where her father worked for the Indian Health Service.

Farina is an Assistant Professor of History at Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, Oklahoma. She is also an affiliate of the Cherokee and Indigenous Studies Department and the Director of the NSU Center for Indigenous Community Engagement.

During the 2016-2017 academic year, Farina was The David J. Weber Fellow for the Study of Southwestern America at the Clements Center for Southwest Studies of Southern Methodist University. She earned her Ph.D. in U.S. History at Arizona State University in 2016. Her first book, The Earth Memory Compass: Diné Landscapes and Education in the Twentieth Century, was published by the University Press of Kansas in October 2018.

She was the Charles Eastman Dissertation Fellow (2015-2016) at Dartmouth College. She received her M.A. in African History from the University of Wisconsin and a B.A. from Brigham Young University with a double major in History and French Studies. She has studied several languages including French, Portuguese, Yoruba, Wolof, and Navajo, and she plans to learn more languages in the future.

Matti Martin
Matti Martin, 24, is matrilineally descended from the Nitahende band of the Mescalero Apache (Nde) Nation and Mauche band of the Southern Ute (Nuuchi). They are a 2spirited (tuwasawits), healer, body-worker, activist, scholar, and an artist who uses art to resist colonial structures, including the patriarchy.

 

BREAKING THE SILENCE: #MMIWG #METOO

Breaking the Silence: #MMIWG #MeToo exhibit will provide the greater community and ALL artists of any background a safe space to explore, illustrate, and voice their story, their narrative, and their truth. Selected art will be on display at NSU-Broken Arrow and if permissible, The Spider Gallery, located in downtown Tahlequah, OK.

NSU Center for Tribal Studies and the NSU Violence Prevention team will be calling ALL artists to submit artwork of any medium to be selected and displayed at the 3rd Annual Breaking the Silence: #MMIWG #MeToo art exhibit.

This exhibit seeks to raise awareness and acknowledge the prevalence of sexual assault and violence. In recent years, the #MeToo movement has drawn national attention to the once silenced voices of survivors of sexual harassment and assault. Many within our Indigenous communities have also taken the opportunity to add to this conversation the number of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls (#MMIWG). Even with the number of undocumented cases, Indigenous women and girls experience sexual assault, violence, and go missing at higher rates than any other ethnic group. Through this exhibit, we hope to draw attention to these issues and provide a safe space for artists to give voice to their story and #MMIWG and #MeToo movements.

For questions contact the Center for Tribal Studies at 918.444.4350.

Entry Guidelines: bit.ly/2021BTSGuidelines
Click the bitly link to download a pdf of the entry guidelines. Artists must agree to these guidelines if entering artwork to be considered for the show.

Artwork Entry Form: bit.ly/2021BTSEntryForm
To submit artwork for consideration, click the bitly link above to go to the Google entry form.

American Indian Heritage Month

Events will take place in November 2020. Dates & events TBA.