Gather Here. Go Far

NSU is where success begins. Here professors know their subjects and how to get you ready for a career after you graduate. We empower individuals to become socially responsible global citizens by creating and sustaining a culture of learning and discovery.

Gather Here. Go Far

NSU is where success begins. Here professors know their subjects and how to get you ready for a career after you graduate. We empower individuals to become socially responsible global citizens by creating and sustaining a culture of learning and discovery.

Gather Here. Go Far

NSU is where success begins. Here professors know their subjects and how to get you ready for a career after you graduate. We empower individuals to become socially responsible global citizens by creating and sustaining a culture of learning and discovery.

Gather Here. Go Far

NSU is where success begins. Here professors know their subjects and how to get you ready for a career after you graduate. We empower individuals to become socially responsible global citizens by creating and sustaining a culture of learning and discovery.

Gather Here. Go Far

NSU is where success begins. Here professors know their subjects and how to get you ready for a career after you graduate. We empower individuals to become socially responsible global citizens by creating and sustaining a culture of learning and discovery.

Symposium Agenda

51st Annual Symposium on the American Indian
Indigenous Scholars Speak on Sovereignty: 100 Years after the Indian Citizenship Act

April 15-20, 2024

Tentative Agenda

 

Monday, April 15

Monday | April 15 | 6:00-7:30pm

Redbud Room (3rd Floor)

Native Student Awards Banquet (Invitation Only, RSVP Required)

Opportunity for our Native students to honor and recognize one another and celebrate their achievements.

Topic Area: Special Event

 

Tuesday, April 16

Tuesday | April 16 | 6:00-8:30pm

Webb Auditorium

Storytelling: Turtle Island Liars’ Club

Enjoy an evening of Cherokee Storytelling

Topic Area: Special Event

 

Wednesday, April 17

Wednesday | April 17 | 9:00-10:30am

Ballroom (2nd Floor)

Opening Ceremony & Keynote Presentation | Hosted by the Native American Student Association

Emcee: Melody Proctor (Keetoowah/Mvskoke), Chair of the American Indian Heritage Committee and Interim Director of the Center for Tribal Studies

Presentation of Colors: Landrey Sweeney

Chandler Wilson

William Moyano

Tanner Reagan

Head Singer: Naoh Shadlow (Osage)

Welcome: Dr. Rodney Hanley, NSU President

Chief of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma:

Chief of the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians:

Introduction of Speaker: Leighton Bearpaw (Cherokee Nation), President, NASA

 

The Future of Oklahoma and Indian Country after McGirt v. Okla.

Robert Miller J.D. (Eastern Shawnee)

Topic Area: Opening & Keynote, Sponsored by the Oklahoma Humanities and National Endowment for the Humanities

 

Wednesday | April 17 | 10:30-10:50am

Ballroom (2nd Floor)

Miller Book Signing: “A Promise Kept”

 

Wednesday | April 17 | 11:00-11:50am

222 (2nd Floor)

Stoking a Fire: Student Presentations on Cherokee Language

Dr. Candessa Tehee (Cherokee Nation), Associate Professor of Cherokee and Indigenous Studies at Northeastern State University; NSU Undergraduate Students: Ray Miller (Cherokee Nation); Kynze Ross (Cherokee Nation); Melissa Whitekiller (Cherokee Nation); Liam McAlpin (Cherokee Nation

In this session, the students will lead presentations on Cherokee language designed to increase learning and promote real world, everyday use of Cherokee language by learners. 

Topic Area: Language Revitalization 

 

Wednesday | April 17 | 11:00-11:50am

223 (2nd Floor)

Abolition is Red: Indigenous Social Movement Art Against the Carceral State

Dr. Michelle Brown (Cherokee)

From Red Nation to NDN Collective, and through a set of recorded interviews with Catawba, Lakota, Diné and Cherokee movement artists, questions of abolition mark temporal and spatial connections that open up past and future anti-colonial horizons.

Topic Areas: Cultural Preservation, Community Building, Indigenous Knowledge, Art, Justice

 

Wednesday | April 17 | 11:00-11:50am

Ballroom Lounge (2nd Floor)

Indigenous Sonic Agency

Nathan Young (Pawnee Nation/Kiowa Tribe/Delaware Tribe of Indians/Cherokee Nation)

Indigenous Sonic Agency is the empowerment of Indigenous communities to control and shape their auditory expressions, reclaiming sound as a means of cultural representation and identity, challenging historical misrepresentations.

Topic Areas: Indigenous Knowledge, Art

 

Wednesday | April 17 | 1:00-1:50pm

222 (2nd Floor)

Regaining Cherokee Sovereignty Through the Preservation of our Language on the Remember the Removal Bike Ride

Kayce O’Field (Cherokee), President of RTRLA; Macie Sullateskee-Crowe (Cherokee), Vice-President RTRLA; Shadow Hardbarger (Cherokee), Treasurer RTRLA; Amaiya Bearpaw (Cherokee), Secretary RTRLA; Charli Barnoskie (Cherokee), Activities Coordinator, RTRLA; Trey Pritchett (Cherokee), Activities Coordinator, RTRLA; Will Chavez Jr. (Cherokee), Public Relations, RTRLA

Cherokee leaders believe to remain a true sovereign Native nation. The tribe must retain its language and ensure it is spoken by not only elders but youth as well.

Topic Areas: Indigenous Leadership, Cultural Preservation, Tribal Sovereignty, Education, History (from an Indigenous perspective), Language Revitalization

 

Wednesday | April 17 | 1:00-1:50pm

223 (2nd Floor)

ᏅᏬᏘ ᎠᏂᎦᏘᏯ The Cherokee Medicine Keepers: Voices for the Land 

Dr. Clint Carroll (Cherokee Nation), Associate Professor in Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado Boulder and 2024 Sequoyah Fellow; Phyllis Edwards (Cherokee), Translation Specialist; John Ross (Cherokee Nation), Translator Specialist for Cherokee Nation Language Center; Anna Sixkiller (Cherokee), Fluent Speaker and Translator 

The Cherokee Medicine Keepers are an incorporated group of fluent-speaking Cherokee elders in Oklahoma whose mission is to preserve and perpetuate Cherokee knowledge of flora, fauna, and sacred places within the Cherokee Nation. They also serve as an advisory board to the Cherokee Nation Office of the Secretary of Natural Resources (OSNR) for the tribe’s ethnobotanical projects, which include the seed bank program, the heirloom garden and native plant area at the tribal complex in Tahlequah, and the Medicine Keepers Preserve—an 800-acre tract of tribal land in Adair County that was designated as the Cherokee Nation’s first cultural conservation area in 2022. This panel will feature their voices and perspectives on this work as well as their overall goals to protect Cherokee lands and perpetuate Cherokee environmental knowledge. The panel will be moderated by Dr. Clint Carroll, who, along with OSNR staff, has served as a facilitator to the group since its inception in 2008.

 

Wednesday | April 17 | 2:00-2:50pm

222 (2nd Floor)

Indigenous Students in Higher Education: A Narrative Account

Dr. Steven Byers (Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma), Associate Professor of Psychology at Northeastern State University

Narrative methods, seldom utilized in such research provides a rich contextual accounting of what works and what limits Indigenous pursuits in higher education. This presentation explores assimilation and enculturation along with collectivism as identity markers that educational institutions founded and operative in individualism and career models need to be deconstructed and modified in order to enhance low stress and efficacious experiences for Indigenous persons in higher education.

Topic Areas: Community Building, Education, Indigenous Knowledge

 

Wednesday | April 17 | 2:00-2:50pm

223 (2nd Floor)

Indigenous Sustainability

Jenna Makes Good (Spirit Lake Nation), 2023 CNAY Brave Heart Fellow

This presentation will introduce new or old ideas of sustainability into the modern indigenous lifestyle. It contains useful information for both urban and city natives to learn about how they can fit different practices into their lives. We will also open up the floor for further brainstorming and discussion. Attendees are crucial when it comes to providing insight pertaining to the area, as well as past experiences and knowledge.

Topic Area: Sustainability

 

Wednesday | April 17 | 2:00-2:50pm

Ballroom Lounge (2nd Floor)

Chahta Anumpa: The Building of a Language

Jason Felihkatubbe (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma)

The development and evolution of the Choctaw language.

Topic Area: History (from an Indigenous perspective), Indigenous Knowledge, Anthropology

 

Wednesday | April 17 | 3:00-3:50pm

222 (2nd Floor)

Rising Stars Leadership Development/Building Healthy Social Networks

Kansas Middletent (Lower Brule Lakota Tribe)

Kansas Middletent has designed a training approach that develops workshops and implementation plans that specifically meet the needs of your school. These workshops will discuss the current research and best practices on supporting ourselves and others as we make changes in our lives. These concepts are the foundation for Prevention programming and can greatly increase a person’s success as they make changes, especially our young people.

Topic Areas: Indigenous Leadership, Community Building, Education, Indigenous Knowledge

 

Wednesday | April 17 | 3:00-3:50pm

223 (2nd Floor)

Indigenous Environmental Network: Protecting Mother Earth, a Discussion

Kaleb Proctor (United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians)

Presenter will provide an overview of the Indigenous Environmental Network, provide links to resources IEN has published, and share story to take to the Protecting Mother Earth conference.

Topic Area: Indigenous Leadership, Community Building, Education, Indigenous Knowledge, Environmental Justice 

 

Wednesday | April 17 | 4:30-6:00pm

Ballroom (2nd Floor)

Language Revitalization in Film

Christopher Cote (Osage/Penobscot), NSU Student; Talee Redcorn (Osage); Lily Gladstone (Blackfeet); Braxton Redeagle (Osage), Director of Osage Language Department; Janis Carpenter (Osage), Teacher

This will be a panel of those who worked on the Osage language for the film “Killers of the Flower Moon”.  

Topic Area: Cultural Preservation, Tribal Sovereignty, Language Revitalization

 

Thursday, April 18

Thursday | April 18 | 9:00-9:50am

222 (2nd Floor)

Soft Power: Proclaiming Tribal Sovereignty through Visual Arts

America Meredith (Cherokee Nation), Publishing Editor; Stacy Pratt (Mvskoke), PhD, Contributing Editor, First American Art Magazine; Amber DuBoise-Shepherd ((Navajo/Sac & Fox/Prairie Band Potawatomi), Artist, Assistant to the Director at the University of Oklahoma School of Visual Arts. 

Native artists serve as ambassadors for their tribal nations, exerting soft power by conveying district histories and worldviews. Three case studies explore strategies artists and tribes employ to support sovereignty.

Topic Areas: Cultural Preservation, Tribal Sovereignty, Education, Art

 

Thursday | April 18 | 9:00-9:50am

223 (2nd Floor)

Inspirational Intelligence: A Narrative for Native Resilience

Lori Riner (Pawnee), Author and Leadership Consultant; Justin Riner (Pawnee), Educator and High School Advisor, Crossover Preparatory School; Taylor Riner (Pawnee), Artist, Writer, and Musician

The potential of the Inspirational Intelligence leadership model in building resilient Indigenous leaders and communities will be explored, providing historical context and perspectives from Native scholars in art and education.

Topic Areas: Indigenous Leadership, Community Building, Education, Art

 

Thursday | April 18 | 9:00-9:50am

Ballroom Lounge (2nd Floor)

The Rehoboth Mission School at Atoka

Jason Felihkatubbe (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma)

Education in the Choctaw Nation.

Topic Areas: Education, History (from an Indigenous perspective)

 

Thursday | April 18 | 10:00-10:50am

222 (2nd Floor)

Keynote:       Hosted by NSU AISES

 

Thursday | April 18 | 11:00-11:50am

222 (2nd Floor)

NAGPRA Groundwork for Healing: Sovereign Pasts, Presents, and Futures

Jordan Poorman Cocker (Kiowa), Curator of Indigenous Art; Kalyn Fay Barnoski (Cherokee Nation enrollee, Muscogee Creek descent), Assistant Curator of Native American Art:Philbrook Museum, Evan Mathis, Director of Collections at the Museum of the Cherokee People, Lizz Toombs (Cherokee Nation) Tribal Historical Preservation Office, Cherokee Nation, and Christina Burk

The panel will offer reflections on the past, present moment, and collective future of museums in relation to modalities of collective healing informed by the new NAGPRA regulations announced in January 2024. 

Topic Area: Indigenous Leadership, Cultural Preservation, Tribal Sovereignty, Community Building, Indigenous Knowledge, Anthropology, Art

 

Thursday | April 18 | 11:00-11:50am

223 (2nd Floor)

Literary Sovereignty: Integrating Native Literature in Higher Education Classrooms

Morgen Cloud (Cherokee Nation and Delaware Tribe of Indians)

There is a plethora of indigenous literature that represents the cultures of indigenous peoples. These perspectives are needed in literature classrooms. I present a short pedagogy to Native literature.

Topic Areas: Tribal Sovereignty, Education, Literature



Thursday | April 18 | 1:00-1:50pm

Ballroom (2nd Floor)

Keynote Presentation Hosted by NSU American Indigenous Business Leaders 

Homesteading Indian Country: American Indians, Land, and the American Dream

Dr. Kasey Keeler (Tuolumne Band Me-Wuk Tribal citizen)

Topic Area: Opening & Keynote, Sponsored by the Oklahoma Humanities and National Endowment for the Humanities

 

Thursday | April 18 | 2:00-2:30pm

Ballroom (2nd Floor)

Book Signing with Dr. Kasey Keeler “American Indians and the American Dream”

 

Thursday | April 18 | 2:00-2:50pm

222 (2nd Floor)

Teaching Indigenous History in a K-12 Setting

Jon Ross (Cherokee/Navajo)

This presentation advocates for integrating Indigenous history into public education, emphasizing its transformative power, ethical responsibility, and broader educational benefits. It provides insights and tools for effective implementation.

Topic Area: Education

 

Thursday | April 18 | 2:00-2:50pm

223 (2nd Floor)

Rising Voices Presentation and Discussion

Kaleb Proctor (United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians)

The presentation will provide an overview of Rising Voices, key points from previous workshops, and a discussion with attendees to share story for the 12th Rising Voices conference.

Topic Area: Indigenous Leadership, Sustainability, Community Building, Education, Environmental Justice

 

Thursday | April 18 | 3:00-3:50pm

222 (2nd Floor)

Leveraging Educational Sovereignty in STEAM Fields Starts with Us: Exploring Scholastic eSports Education within Indian Country

Kelly Berry (Apache Tribe of Oklahoma), Indigenous Initiatives Research Associate; Cornel Pewewardy (Comanche/Kiowa), Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Central Oklahoma

This workshop will explore eSports and how they unfold in educational systems throughout Indian Country with discourse of how eSports develop 21st Century skills and infuse Indigenous ways of knowing. 

Topic Areas: Indigenous Leadership, Education, Indigenous Knowledge

 

Thursday | April 18 | 3:00-3:50pm

223 (2nd Floor)

"It Wasn't the School, It Was The People": Sharing the Stories of Native Graduate Students at a NASNTI

Sky Wildcat (Cherokee Nation/Mvskoke)

This presentation will share how Native graduate students experienced challenges, resilience, resistance, and community at a Native American Serving NonTribal Institution.

Topic Area: Education

 

Thursday | April 18 | 4:00-4:50pm

Ballroom (2nd Floor)

A Screening and Discussion of _Cherokee Stickmaker_, featuring Cherokee National Treasure David Comingdeer

Chris Teuton (Cherokee Nation), Professor and Chair of American Indian Studies at University of Washington; Jeff Corntassel (Cherokee Nation), Professor, University of Victoria, Cherokee Nation

_Cherokee Stickmaker_ (2023) is a documentary short featuring Cherokee National Treasure David Comingdeer discussing his process of becoming a stickball stick maker and the importance of perpetuating Cherokee cultural traditions intergenerationally. The film was produced and directed by Dr. Chris Teuton and Dr. Jeff Corntassel, who will present the film and discuss its creation and message with the audience.

Topic Areas: Cultural Preservation, Indigenous Knowledge, Art

 

Friday, April 19 (Virtual Sessions)

Friday | April 19| 9:00-9:50am

Zoom 

Indigenous Language Resurgence

Miana Fay (Oglala Lakota and Sahiyela); Kaleb Proctor (United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians)

A conversation to collaborate on revitalizing and sustaining Lakota, Keetoowah, & Mvskoke languages for future generations.

Topic Areas: Cultural Preservation, Education, Language Revitalization 

 

Friday | April 19| 10:00-10:50am

Zoom 

"I Still Don't Feel Like I Know What I'm Doing": De-mystifying and Discussing the Experiences of Native Doctoral Students

Sky Wildcat (Cherokee Nation/Mvskoke); James Wagnon (Cherokee Nation), Graduate Research Assistant, University of Oklahoma; McKalee Steen (Cherokee Nation) , PhD. Candidate, University of California, Berkeley; April Yazza (Dine/Zuni), PhD. Cohort Scholar, University of New Mexico; Jade Vann (Cherokee Nation), PhD. Candidate, University of Arkansas; Terry Chavis (Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina), PhD. Candidate, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

Reflecting on a century of legal recognition, the panelists aim to demystify and discuss doctoral education from their lived experiences as first-gen Native doctoral students. 

Topic Area: Education

 

Friday | April 19| 11:00-11:50am

Zoom 

Tó éí ííńá: Arizona v. Navajo Nation and Diné Water Rights

Summer Powell (Diné (Navajo))

Tó éí ííńá: Arizona v. Navajo Nation and Diné Water Rights is presenting about the recent US Supreme Court case, Arizona v. Navajo Nation, and my relationship to this case.

Topic Area: Environmental Justice

 

Friday | April 19| 1:00-1:50pm

Zoom

Lost Among the Skeletons: Mapping the potential for live oak ghost forests in Southeast Louisiana & exploring cultural losses

Rachel Billiot (enrolled United Houma Nation, mixed Houma and Chitimacha descent) 

Explore the biocultural importance of live oak forests for Indigenous communities in southeast Louisiana and how relationships to these forests could be affected by saltwater intrusion. 

Topic Areas: Indigenous Knowledge, Environmental Justice

 

Friday | April 19 | 2:00-5:00pm

Beta Field

Social Stickball (weather permitting)

Join us for two of our Symposium favorites, traditional games! Co-hosted by the NSU Native student organizations, the Native American Student Association, American Indian Science and Engineering Society and American Indigenous Business Leaders.

Topic Area: Traditional Games

 

NSU POWWOW

Saturday, April 20

Saturday | April 20 | 2:00-11:00pm

Event Center

 

2pm Gourd Dancing

5pm Dinner Break

6pm Resume Gourd Dancing and Grand Entry

Christopher Cote (Osage/Penobscot), Head Man

Chloe Tyner (Shawnee), Head Lady 

John Arkeketa (Otoe Missouria), Head Singer

Kelly Anquoe (Kiowa/Cherokee), Arena Director 

Billy Flint (Cherokee), Head Gourd

Archie Mason (Osage/Cherokee), MC

 

Topic Area: Powwow