Symposium Agenda

49th-Annual-Symposium-agenda

Symposium Agendas

Monday, April 4
6 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Redbud Room
In-Person

Native Student Organization Awards Banquet (by invitation only, RSVP required)


Monday, April 4
9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Webb 614 & Tower
In-Person

Mapping Tahlequah History Workshop:
Hosted by the NSU Department of History and Geography and Political Science with sponsorship provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Democracy demands wisdom project. 

The Mapping Tahlequah History Workshop features presentations and conversations about digital mapping and local history in Green Country. The workshop includes an introduction to the Mapping Tahlequah History (MTH) project, a keynote talk with Dr. Brenden W. Rensink highlighting the Intermountain Histories, and sessions focused on Cherokee Landscapes and Languages and learning with MTH and community partners such as the Hunter's Home, Thompson House, and John Hair Cultural Center and Museum. The workshop will host a student poster session and luncheon, during which NSU students present and share posters about their research for Mapping Tahlequah History. There will also be an optional campus tour, emphasizing the history of the area. The keynote talk and "Cherokee Landscapes and Language" session will be available via Zoom as well as in person. Advance registration is required at https://bit.ly/MTHApr4.


Monday, April 4
10:30 - 11:45 a.m.
Webb 614 & Tower
In-Person

Reconnecting the Public with Their Pasts Through History
Mapping Talequah History Keynote:
Dr. Brenden W. Rensink

Hosted by the NSU Department of History and Geography and Political Science with sponsorship provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Democracy demands wisdom project.  Register at https://bit.ly/mthapr4 

Dr. Brenden W. Rensink is the keynote speaker of the 2022 Mapping Tahlequah History Workshop. He will highlight insights and experiences from his work with local history and digital mapping projects such as the Intermountain Histories. His talk is titled, "Reconnecting the Public With Their Pasts Through Digital History." Brenden W. Rensink (Ph.D., 2010) is Associate Director of the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies and an Associate Professor of History at Brigham Young University. For 2020-2023, he is the Marjorie Pay Hinckley Young Scholar for the FHSS College at BYU. His recent monograph, Native but Foreign: Indigenous Immigrants and Refugees in the North American Borderlands (Connecting the Greater West Series, Texas A&M University Press, 2018), won the 2019 Spur Award for Best Historical Nonfiction Book from the Western Writers of America. He created and directs two ongoing public history initiatives for the Redd Center: serving as the Project Manager and General Editor of the Intermountain Histories digital public history project and as the Host and Producer of the Writing Westward Podcast. Professor Rensink can be found online at www.bwrensink.org or http://www.twitter.com/brendenwrensink.

Tuesday, April 5
11 a.m. - 1 p.m.
UC Basement
In-Person

Cultural Exhibit:
Coordinated by Trey Pritchett (Cherokee Nation), Student Majoring in Cherokee Cultural Studies


Tuesday, April 5
1 - 2:15 p.m.
Ballroom (Reserve 229)
Virtual

Amplifying the Voice of our Indigenous Youth
Pre-Conference Virtual Keynote: Megan Redshirt Shaw (Oglala Dakota Nation), Director, Native Student Services at University of South Dakota

Presentation will focus on the importance of the voices of our Indigenous youth and how platforms like the the Natives In America literary publication can support this effort.


Tuesday, April 5
3 - 5 p.m.
Beta Field
In-Person

Social Stickball Game

Co-sponsored by Center for Tribal Studies and Native American Student Association


Tuesday, April 5
6 - 7:30 p.m.
Webb 614
In-Person

Film Series: Searching for Sequoyah, with special guests LeAnne Howe and Joshua Nelson

Searching for Sequoyah chronicles the life and accomplishments of the legendary 19th century Cherokee visionary, Sequoyah (George Guess), through the oral stories of five modern day Sequoyah descendants. While much is known about Sequoyah's Cherokee writing system or syllabary, very little is known about the man himself. How did this illiterate Cherokee invent a writing system that transformed the future of his people? From Tuskegee, Tennessee to Zaragoza, Mexico, Searching for Sequoyah takes viewers on a journey retracing his final quest to reunite his fellow Cherokees in Mexico, the mystery surrounding his death, and the legacy he left behind.

Wednesday, April 6
10 - 11:30 a.m.
Ballroom
In-Person

Opening Ceremonies and Keynote TBD Hosted by Native American Student Association


Wednesday, April 6
11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
UC Basement
In-Person

Cultural Exhibit:
Coordinated by Trey Pritchett (Cherokee Nation), Student Majoring in Cherokee Cultural Studies


Wednesday, April 6
1 -1:50 p.m.
223-224
In-Person

Indigenous Storytelling to Scientific Research: Paving a Pathway for Intellectual Curiosity
Dr. Celia Stall-Meadows
(Choctaw Nation), Tribal Research Manager at Choctaw Nation of OK

How can tribes encourage intellectual curiosity among undergraduates whose research is limited to one semester? Students are keenly interested in their tribe’s culture but are hampered by extensive tribal processes.


Wednesday, April 6
1 - 1:50 p.m.
Ballroom Lounge
In-Person

Glorifying Our Roots: The Legacy and Impact of Gamma Delta Pi, Inc. Native American Sisterhood
Amber Silverhorn Wolfe
(Wichita and affiliated tribes Nation), Doctoral Student, University of Oklahoma Director Wichita Tribe Education Department at University of Oklahoma
James Wagnon (Cherokee Nation), Doctoral Student University of Oklahoma
Natalie Youngbull(Cheyenne and Arapaho Nation), Assistant Professor University of Oklahoma
Robin Minthorn (Kiowa Nation), Associate Professor University of Washington Tacoma

The purpose of this workshop is to provide participants with greater understanding of the impact of a Native American sisterhood on the cultivation of tribal/cultural identity, cultural connections, and relationships.


Wednesday, April 6
2 - 2:50 p.m.
223-224
In-Person

Elevating the Voices of Native Youth with Slam Performance by Exploring Nativeness to Fulfill their Ancestors’ Dreams
Dr. Amoneeta
(Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians), Assistant Professor of Psychology  at Fort Lewis College

Native youth identity is explored in this interactive, empowering, fun workshop that explores slam poetry as a means to fulfilling their ancestors’ dreams and connecting to their own Nativeness.


Wednesday, April 6
2 - 2:50 p.m.
Ballroom Lounge
Virtual

Indigenous Environmental Studies and Science: Reclaiming land ethics, governance, and the futurity of place-based learning and knowing.
Melinda Adams
(San Carlos Apache Nation), PhD candidate at The University of California, Davis

This discussion will centralize examples of Indigenous scholars engaging in themes of Indigenous Environmental Studies and Sciences (IESS), and will unpack the community-faced research initiatives deployed to address complex environmental issues our Indigenous Nations face.


Wednesday, April 6
3 - 3:50 p.m.
223-224
Virtual

Allotment Stories: Indigenous Land Relations Under Settler Siege
Candessa Tehee
(Cherokee Nation), Associate Professor at Northeastern State University
Catherine Foreman Gray (Cherokee Nation), Cherokee Nation
Stacy Leeds, Arizona State University (Cherokee Nation)
Ginger Reeves, Cherokee Nation (Cherokee Nation)

A panel of scholars and professionals in the field will deliver brief orienting remarks and engage in a brief moderated discussion while seeking to provoke the audience to further research into Indigenous resilience.


Wednesday, April 6
3 - 3:50 p.m.
Ballroom Lounge
Virtual

How to Get Away with Murder: American Courts in Indian Territory
Liza Black
(Cherokee Nation), Visiting Scholar at UCLA

Liza Black will address the crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous women in the Americas, broadly defined, and spend special attention to Indian Territory, Cherokee Nation, and Oklahoma in the early 20th century, arguing that American law is part of the cause behind the missing and murdered Native women of Oklahoma.


Wednesday, April 6
6 - 7:30 p.m.
Webb 614
In-Person

Film Series: The Thick Dark Fog (NEH Sponsored)

Walter Littlemoon attended a federal Indian boarding school in South Dakota sixty years ago. The mission of many of these schools in 1950, was still to “kill the Indian and save the man.” The children were not allowed to be Indians – to speak their language or express their culture or native identity in any way at the risk of being severely beaten, humiliated or abused. What effects did these actions cause? Many Native people, like Walter, lived with this unresolved trauma into adulthood, acting it out through alcoholism and domestic violence. At age 58, Walter decided to write and publish his memoirs as a way to explain his past abusive behaviors to his estranged children. But dealing with the memories of his boarding school days nearly put an end to the project. “The Thick Dark Fog” tells the story of how Walter confronted the “thick dark fog” of his past so that he could heal himself and his community.

Thursday, April 7
9 - 9:50 a.m.
223-224
In-Person

Teaching and Learning about Railroads in Indian Territory
Farina King
(Diné Nation), Associate Professor of History at Northeastern State University
Jarren Fourkiller, History major undergraduate student, Northeastern State University, Cherokee citizen. Charlee J. Gilliam, General Studies major undergraduate student, Northeastern State University. Ernestine Berry, Executive Director of the John Hair Cultural Center and Museum of the UKB, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokees (UKB).

This panel includes educators, scholars, students, and tribal historians and their efforts to collaborate in the learning and teaching of Indigenous perspectives and histories of railroads in Indian territory.


Thursday, April 7
10 - 10:50 a.m.
223-224
In-Person 

Cherokee Language Teaching Demonstration
Carolyn Swepston
(Cherokee Nation), Northeastern State University student
Lyndsey Keener (Cherokee Nation), Northeastern State University student
Cody Vann (Cherokee Nation), Northeastern State University student

In this presentation, students in the Cherokee Education and Cherokee Cultural Studies programs will provide a teaching demonstration in Cherokee language. This session will focus on Cherokee immersion methodology.


Thursday, April 7
10 - 10:50 a.m.
Ballroom Lounge
In-Person

Maintaining Cultural Capital Through Tourism in Zuni Pueblo
Dr. Ben Kracht
, Professor of Anthropology, Department Chair, Cherokee & Indigenous Studies at Northeastern State University
Kaleb Standridge (Choctaw Nation), NSU student
Erin Long, NSU student
Cyterica Flores, NSU student

Students will discuss the cultural tours at Zuni Pueblo and their experiences with Zuni artisans.


Thursday, April 7
11 a.m. - 1 p.m.
UC Basement
In-Person

Cultural Exhibit

Coordinated by Trey Pritchett (Cherokee Nation), Student Majoring in Cherokee Cultural Studies


Thursday, April 7
11 - 11:50 a.m.
223-224
In-Person

Blending Cultural and STEM Learning using Virtual Reality
Dr. Nicole Colston
, Assistant Research Professor at Oklahoma State University
Dr. Cynthia Orona (Mississippi Band of Choctaw), NAMAS Program Coordinator, Oklahoma State University
Dr. Tilanka Chandrasekera, Director of the Mixed Reality Lab, Oklahoma State University.
Dr. Tutaleni I. Asino, Director of the Emerging Technologies and Creativity Research Lab, Oklahoma State University.

Our project blends cultural and STEM learning in an immersive technology environment (virtual reality/augmented reality) where American Indian youth become producers, not just consumers, of these exciting media. 


Thursday, April 7
12 - 12:50 p.m.
Ballroom Lounge
In-Person

Identifying the Tricksters of Higher Education
Corey Still, Ph.D.
 (United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Nation), Director of Student Programming and Research at American Indian Graduate Center

This workshop with look at the liver experiences of Native student and help us identify and understand the various trickster they encounter in their respective journeys.


Thursday, April 7
1 - 2 p.m.
Ballroom
Virtual

Intersectionality of Indigenous Language and Culture with Leadership in Higher Education
Virtual Keynote: Dr. Corey Still (United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians Nation), Director of Student Programming and Research at American Indian Graduate Center

Leadership is a complex word. For those that study it, it can have several different meanings and interpretation. However, when we think about leadership from an Indigenous perspective there are factors at play that influence leadership quite differently from non-Indigenous leadership styles. Dr. Still will discuss the intersectionality of Indigeneity of and leadership and how they connect in higher education to create a more inclusive and intentional space for Indigenous communities on college campuses.


Thursday, April 7
2 - 2:50 p.m.
223-224
In-Person

Being Native American in STEM: A Webinar Series to Network & Share Resources
Nicole Colston
(Mississippi Band of Choctaw Nation), Assistant Professor, NREM at Oklahoma State University
Cynthia Orona, Program Manager, Oklahoma State University

From inviting guests to archiving on YouTube to planning, we share our tips and templates with session participants.


Thursday, April 7
2 - 2:50 p.m.
Ballroom Lounge
In-Person

Indigenizing the Art World: Oklahoman Native Americans Modeling Best Practices
Stacy Pratt
(Muscogee Nation), Arts writer/MHz Curationist Critics of Color Resident at MHz Curationist Critics of Color
Amber DuBoise-Shephard Navajo/Prairie Potawatomi/Sac & Fox), Education Director, Artist, Mabee-Gerrer Museum

America Meredith Cherokee Nation), Publishing Editor and Artist, First American Art Magazine

This panel focuses on how Native artists, curators, critics, and art historians from Oklahoma continue our longstanding legacy of Indigenizing conversations and practices in the art world.


Thursday, April 7
3 - 3:50 p.m.
223-224
Virtual

From the Outback to Indian Territory: the potential of Indigenous-led tourism
Bobbie Chew Bigby
(Cherokee Nation), PhD student, Nulungu Research Institute at University of Notre Dame Australia

This presentation offers an overview of my PhD research that has focused on the connection between Indigenous-led tourism and cultural resurgence across both Indigenous Australia and Oklahoma Indian Country. Examining different political and historical contexts, as well as the faces behind different tours and tour planning and the impact of COVID-19 across Indigenous communities, this presentation offers stories and images that make up this research project. The session welcomes open discussion.


Thursday, April 7
3 - 3:50 p.m.
Ballroom Lounge
In-Person 

"The cake of loving sincerity": Food Colonization and Familial Myth in Louise Erdrich's The Antelope Wife
Lily M. McCully, PhD
(Cherokee Nation), Editor, Independent Scholar

This paper will demonstrate the ways that Erdrich’s The Antelope Wife (1998) provides a pattern for resistance to colonized food pathways through a reversal of the colonizing narrative. 


Thursday, April 7
6 - 7:00 p.m.
Webb 614
In-Person

Film Series: Badger Creek (NEH Sponsored)

Badger Creek is a half-hour documentary portrait of a Blackfeet (Pikuni) family, the Mombergs, who live on the lower Blackfeet Reservation in Montana near the banks of Badger Creek. In addition to running a prosperous ranching business, they practice a traditional Blackfeet cultural lifestyle that sustains and nourishes them, including sending their children to a Blackfeet language immersion school, participating in Blackfeet spiritual ceremonies and maintaining a Blackfeet worldview. The film takes us through a year in the life of the family, and through four seasons of the magnificent and traditional territory of the Pikuni Nation.

Friday, April 8
10 - 11:15 a.m.
Ballroom
In-Person

Walking with Our Ancestors: Indigenizing the Academy
Keynote:  Dr. Robin Zape-tah-hol-ah Starr Minthorn (Kiowa, Apache, Nez Perce, Umatilla (Cayuse) and Assiniboine Nations), Associate Professor and Director of Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership at University of Washington Tacoma

In this presentation, participants will engage in heartwork that centers and acknowledges that our ancestors walk with us on our life’s journey. We will engage in ways to Indigenize the academy that centers ancestral knowledge, relational learning while being community grounded.


Friday, April 8
11:15 am - 11:45 am
Ballroom
In-Person

Book Signing Dr. Minthorn


Friday, April 8
12 - 12:50 p.m.
223-224
In-Person

Discussing Indigenous Leadership
Corey Still, Ph.D.
 (United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Nation), Director of Student Programming and Research at American Indian Graduate Center

4 student presenters from my class

This format will be for four 15-minute presentations for a students in a Native Leadership Course.


Friday, April 8
1 - 1:50 p.m.
Ballroom
In-Person

The Transformational Indigenous Praxis Model
Dr. Cornel Pewewardy
(Comanche Nation Nation), Vice-Chairman, Comanche Nation at Professor Emeritus, Portland State University
Dr. Robin Minthorn (Kiowa), Associate Professor, SOE Univ of Washington Tacoma; Dr. Anna Lees (Waganakasing Odawa descendant), Associate Professor, SOE Western Washington University

The TIPM serves as a framework to help educators understand various layers of Indigenous consciousness and how critical consciousness can be developed and followed by commitment and action for social transformation. The model provides a scaffolding process to promote critical thinking and working through dimensions of social stratification in terms of power hierarchies brought about through colonized practices based on individuals, cultures, and institutional structures.


Friday, April 8
2 - 2:50 p.m.
223-224
In-Person

Decolonizing National Museums Northern Ireland: A Journey of Truth and Healing
Chelle S. McIntyre-Brewer
(non-enrolled Cherokee (Arkansas) Nation), Student- NSU, Cultural Liaison- NMNI at NSU, National Museums Northern Ireland
Liam Corrie, Curator of Emigration, National Museums Northern Ireland
Triona White Hamilton, Curator of Modern History, National Museums Northern Ireland
Michael Nephew (Eastern Band Cherokee, Seneca, Cayuga Nations), Elder

We also have the potential of having others including Sean Young, Haida Gwaii Cultural Center curator, Judith Shapiro, attorney on Indigenous policy, Brandon Tacadena, Pacific Islander Association of WA, Jules Thornton, Cherokee Nation, and others who are part of our team across the globe.  This depends on whether the conference will allow us to present virtually given our geographic spread and the situation with COVID. I will confirm all of this if selected and update accordingly. 

Learn about how Repatriation and Decolonization at National Museums Northern Ireland has become a positive experience by engaging with our global team to discuss our goal to acknowledge trauma and grow in healing.


Friday, April 8
2 - 2:50 p.m.
Ballroom Lounge
In-Person

Fulfilling Ancestors’ Dreams of Tribal Sovereignty Through Research Partnerships and Protections
Dannielle Branam
(Choctaw Nation), Research Scientist III at Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

A rich understanding of tribal sovereignty can be gained by analyzing how tribes have developed research protections, partnership procedures, and tribal research departments.


Friday, April 8
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
UC 2nd Floor Landing
In-Person

Student Research Poster Presentations

NSU Powwow

Head Staff: 

Head Man, Christian Rangel (Navajo/Cherokee Nations)

Head Lady, Tiana Long (Navajo/Ponca/Lakota Nations)

AD, Stanley Smith (Ponca/Creek Nations)

Head Gourd, Darren Stroud (Cherokee/Navajo Nations)

MC, Neil Lawhead (Ottawa/Cherokee/Kiowa/Comanche Nations)

Head Singer, Joel Deerinwater (Cherokee/Creek Nations)